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May 4, 2005

The puppies danced to Gong's "Downwind."

A lot of types have a real big problem with Weezer's "Beverly Hills." But if you ask me, it resembles in both sound and sentiment what the band's been up to all along. I say as much right here, in a piece for this week's Metro Times. I've never been the biggest Weez supporter. I mean, I wasn't one of those guys who walked around with his portable blue backdrop unfurled on Support the Blue Album day in 1995. However, I've always admired Rivers Cuomo's ability to write universally appreciated pop songs from a position of self-loathing, neurosis, and geekdom. And that's what "Beverly Hills" does. It reminds me of when I defended Shania Twain's "Party for Two," the single from her greatest hits album of late 2004. A bunch of people named Anonymous - evidently, I know a lot of Greeks - emailed to yell at me for saying a Shania/Mark McGrath duet was the jam. But I don't think I actually said it was a great. All I did was point out its Mutt Lange-designed joy button guidance system. The chorus caused grins like Bob Evans eats breakfast. Weezer's "Beverly Hills" does the same thing. Chowderhead riff, shoutalong lyrics written for a third grade intellect, California: like the muthuckin' Kid's "Cowboy", the song's a happy fun ball lark jacked with cynicism, hedonism, and a million watts of electricity.

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"There's love for the pop and rock canons in every note Cobra Verde write, so a mirthy, clever, and well-played covers set from the Ohio combo isn't any kind of surprise." Copycat Killers highlights: versions of Pink's "Get the Party Started", Donna Summer's "I Fee Love", and Mott the Hoople's "Rock and Roll Queen".

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Miss Kittin's new Mixing Me EP is a party-ready primer for anyone wondering what the F is going on with Europe's versions of techno, electro, and other music you plug in. The set's compiled from various vinyl-only mixes of I Com material, and it's all "unshakeably beat-driven and uniformly cool."

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"House of Wax's soundtrack is pretty adequate for a quickie summer horror picture about the stalking, killing, and eventual waxing of handsome young people...[It] includes pretty much what you'd expect from the soundtrack to a movie so scary, it stars Paris Hilton."

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JTL

Posted by Johnny Loftus at May 4, 2005 9:18 AM